Read our FAQ page on COVID-19 safety measures

Spring Semester

Academic Offerings

The Italy Center offers courses on a rotating basis each year. Below you will find the courses listed by semester linked to their full course descriptions. Please note the following items when considering your course schedule (applicable to semester programs only):

  • All courses are three (3) credits unless otherwise noted
  • 12-15 total credit hours per semester (any more must be approved by the Director)
  • Minimum three (3) credits of Italian; Upper level Italian (2XX-3XX) requires prior academic credit in lower level Italian courses.
  • HUM 295 and 490 are permission only and have separate applications (see each course for details)
  • Course offerings are tentative. Finalization of offerings is based on course enrollment numbers and student interest.

Download the IC Academic Curriculum as a PDF (updated document available soon)


Spring Semester

Art Sciences

Art History 299: Artbreakers: Italian Women Artists from Renaissance to Modern Era

ARH 299 Syllabus

Generally speaking, the history of Italian Art deals sporadically with female artists and considers only a few famous cases. From the Renaissance to today, female artists have often played a significant role in art history. This course offers the students a journey—from a female perspective—through Italian Art from the Late Renaissance to Modern times.

Art 254: Introduction to Photography

This course will examine, on a basic level, the nature and importance of the audiovisual medium today in the areas of artistic expression and documentary or social commentary. This will be accomplished primarily in photo and short video assignments covering a variety of basic techniques, using mobile devices and digital cameras. (SHCIC camera provided). Also offered as CMM 254. (Communication Arts majors must take this course as CMM not ART; it does not fulfill the core ART requirement for Communication Arts majors). Refundable deposit for equipment use required.

Communications 254: Introduction to Photography

This course will examine, on a basic level, the nature and importance of the audiovisual medium today in the areas of artistic expression and documentary or social commentary. This will be accomplished primarily in photo and short video assignments covering a variety of basic techniques, using mobile devices and digital cameras. (SHCIC camera provided). Also offered as ART 254. Refundable deposit for equipment use required.

Business

Business 301: Business Law

This course will give an introduction into many areas of the law, including contracts, torts, criminal law, civil procedure, corporate law, property, the court system and all areas of employment law. Practical application of such law will be heavily emphasized.

Business 309: Environment, Business, and Ethics

BUS 309 Syllabus

An exploration of environmental issues on the global scale, exploring ethical and economic dilemmas as they arise with the increasing interaction of Global North and South. Also offered as PHL 309.

Finance 321: Money & Capital Markets

A study of the operations and roles of the major participants in the financial system and the factors influencing them. Topics include: financial institutions, central banking, monetary policy, interest rates, financial markets, financial innovation and regulatory reform.

Interdisciplinary

Gender Studies 397: Gender Issues in Italy

Students will be introduced to the main topics and keywords related to feminism and gender studies throughout the course, focusing on their meaning and applicability to the Italian context. Each topic will be approached in two steps. First, a theoretical approach serves as a reference point in confronting real-life dilemmas. Second, a practical approach is offered through a workshop complemented by case studies, offering students the opportunity to delve deeper into actual experiences and observe Italian reality.
The course stresses the non-dominant role of women throughout the world and in Italy. In particular, Italian culture’s specificities related to gender in the past and present day. Also offered as IDS 397.

Interdisciplinary Studies 390: Contemporary Italian Culture

This course will introduce students to a number of social, cultural, and political trends and issues in contemporary Italy (interdisciplinary special topics). This course will be taught on either a tutorial or seminar basis. All readings and screenings will be in English or have English subtitles; no prior knowledge of Italian or Italy is required.

Interdisciplinary Studies 397: Gender Issues in Italy

Students will be introduced to the main topics and keywords related to feminism and gender studies throughout the course, focusing on their meaning and applicability to the Italian context. Each topic will be approached in two steps. First, a theoretical approach serves as a reference point in confronting real-life dilemmas. Second, a practical approach is offered through a workshop complemented by case studies, offering students the opportunity to delve deeper into actual experiences and observe Italian reality.
The course stresses the non-dominant role of women throughout the world and in Italy. In particular, Italian culture’s specificities related to gender in the past and present day. Also offered as GDR 397.

Internship & Research Opportunities

Humanities 295: Directed Undergraduate Research

HUM 295 Syllabus

The Spring Hill College Italy Center Director will work with a student and his home campus adviser to assist in designing an academic research project. The project goals and objectives are to be agreed upon by the student with his/her home campus professor. The Italy Center will assist in aligning the student with community resources to include a faculty advisor. Examples of undergraduate research projects include a study of sibling relationships in a Bologna Rom (gypsy) camp and Italian language acquisition among immigrant North African children compared to their parent’s language abilities. Independent studies will be approved solely for students who exhibit a prior track record of academic excellence and an ability to work independently.

Humanities 490: Social Justice Internship

HUM 490 Syllabus

Professional experience through a semester of directed part-time internship at a local cultural, business, or not-for-profit Bologna agency. Enrollment is restricted and will require a two-month advance correspondence with the Spring Hill College Italy Center Internship Coordinator. Students are expected to work a minimum of ten hours per week in a community agency. Placements are available in both the English and Italian languages.

Languages & Literature

English 321: Italian Literature–Dante in English

ENG 321 Syllabus

This course introduces students to Dante’s major literary works, La Vita Nuova (The New Life) and the Divine Comedy. Close readings of the text will give students an appreciation of Dante’s place in world literature. Dante’s masterpieces will also be discussed from a historical and philosophical perspective, and supplementary readings will acquaint the reader with the medieval view of life and literature.

Italian 101: Elementary Italian I

ITA 101 Syllabus

The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to the Italian language. This intensive course combines a typical semester’s worth of material into a five-week session. Emphasis will be placed on developing speaking, listening – comprehension, reading and writing expressions, and grammar sufficient to support these. Students can expect to learn about modern Italy through in-class activities and homework assignments, including geography, culture, history, and society. Spring Hill students can practice daily class lessons in one’s life in the residence hall. The majority of Friday’s will include a cultural trip, allowing one to practice his/her language skills in the city while offering exposure to some of the hidden treasures, markets, and galleries of Bologna.

Italian 102: Elementary Italian II

ITA 102 Syllabus

The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to the Italian language. This intensive course combines a typical semester’s worth of material into a five-week session. Emphasis will be placed on developing speaking, listening – comprehension, reading and writing expressions, and grammar sufficient to support these. Students can expect to learn about modern Italy through in-class activities and homework assignments, including geography, culture, history, and society. Spring Hill students can practice daily class lessons in one’s life in the residence hall. The majority of Friday’s will include a cultural trip, allowing one to practice his/her language skills in the city while offering exposure to some of the hidden treasures, markets, and galleries of Bologna.

Italian 201: Intermediate Italian

ITA 201 Syllabus

The primary goal of this course is to advance students in the Italian language. Aspects of teaching will entail: reading, analysis, and class discussion of texts (articles, songs, short stories), oral presentations based on research on the newspapers, writing homework assignments (compositions, essays, journal). This course is conducted entirely in Italian. There is an emphasis on developing speaking, listening – comprehension, reading and writing expressions, and grammar sufficient to support these. Spring Hill students can practice daily class lessons in one’s life in the residence hall. Dedicated Fridays will include a cultural trip, allowing one to practice his/her language skills in the city while offering exposure to some of the hidden treasures, markets, and galleries of Bologna. Students are required to have taken two semesters of Italian at the collegiate level.

Italian 205: Contemporary Readings in Italian

A course devoted to topics of interest to students and faculty. Students are required to have taken two semesters of Italian at the collegiate level.

Italian 381: Advanced Italian

ITA 381 Syllabus

The primary goal of this course is to advance students in the Italian language. Aspects of teaching will entail: reading, analysis, and class discussion of texts (articles, songs, short stories), oral presentations based on research on the newspapers, writing homework assignments (compositions, essays, journal). This course is conducted entirely in Italian. There is an emphasis on developing speaking, listening – comprehension, reading and writing expressions, and grammar sufficient to support these. Spring Hill students can practice daily class lessons in one’s life in the residence hall. Dedicated Fridays will include a cultural trip, allowing one to practice his/her language skills in the city while offering exposure to some of the hidden treasures, markets, and galleries of Bologna. Students are required to have taken three/four semesters of Italian at the collegiate level.

Philosophy & Theology

Philosophy 309: Environment, Business, and Ethics

PHL 309 Syllabus 

An exploration of environmental issues on the global scale, exploring ethical and economic dilemmas as they arise with the increasing interaction of Global North and South. Also offered as BUS 309.

Theology 261: World Religions

THL 261 Syllabus

This course studies religious faith as a central fact of history and world culture through a reflective interpretation of significant historical and theological documents. The survey course is anchored in the literature of Christianity, Islam, and Judaism.

Theology 345: Religion & Culture

A study of religious faith as a central fact of history and world culture through a reflective interpretation of major literary, historical, and theological documents.

Science & Mathematics

Biology 110: Environmental Biology

BIO 110 Syllabus

This course will study the interrelationships between humans and their environment. The course furnishes an understanding of biological principles and the properties of life. It explores the fundamentals of ecology and its relevance to human impact on natural systems. This includes ecosystem structure and function, population dynamics, human impacts on the earth’s natural resources, and “green” economics.

Service – Learning Opportunities

Social Science 295: Human Rights & Global Change

SSC 295 Syllabus

Community-Based Research and Service designed to acquaint students with the leading human rights issues confronting Italy and Europe, the course focuses on the changing face of the Mediterranean as new immigrant groups are arriving at unprecedented numbers while fleeing dictatorships in the Arab world. The class will concentrate on how Italians, the media, the Italian government, and the European Union are protecting (or failing to protect) immigrants and political asylum seekers fleeing from nations at war or on the verge of collapse. This course will bring students in direct contact with immigrants themselves. Students are required to conduct a minimum of 24 hours of community-based research and service work in the community.

Social Sciences

History 312: Medieval Civilization

A study of the European Middle Ages from about 1300-1400. Special attention will be given to the problems faced by feudal society as well as the creative achievements in the areas of economics, politics and culture. 

History 315: Understanding the Mediterranean

HIST 315 Syllabus

This course introduces students to an alternative analysis of the Mediterranean region. Students will gain insight into the region’s historical development and its current strategic and geopolitical dimension. The main focus of this class is to provide Italian context on different variables that have caused contrast between Mediterranean, MENA, and European areas (i.e., international conflicts, economic crisis, religion and institutions, and present-day democratization). Students’ academic experiences will be enhanced through discussion of the historical and political background of the Mediterranean. Also offered as POL 315.

Political Science 315: Understanding the Mediterranean

POL 315 Syllabus

This course introduces students to an alternative analysis of the Mediterranean region. Students will gain insight into the region’s historical development and its current strategic and geopolitical dimension. The main focus of this class is to provide Italian context on different variables that have caused contrast between Mediterranean, MENA, and European areas (i.e., international conflicts, economic crisis, religion and institutions, and present-day democratization). Students’ academic experiences will be enhanced through discussion of the historical and political background of the Mediterranean. Also offered as HIS 315.

Political Science 375: Terrorism, Revolution & War

POL 375 Syllabus

A central theme in this course is to figure out the extent to which wars are the purposeful, rational pursuit of policy or the result of seemingly inexorably forces over which there is little control. The course will explore the dilemmas both countries and international organizations face when addressing political violence in their own country and/or abroad. At the end of the semester, students will develop a deep understanding of the political and moral justifications for resorting to force when confronting political violence.

Political Science 376: Comparative Foreign Policy

An overview of major theoretically-informed approaches to foreign policy analysis that are not limited to a single state, decision, unit or point in time. Examines how foreign policy decisions are made with attention to policy input and process rather than policy outcomes. Experiential learning culminates in a simulation of a foreign policy crisis. 

Political Science 379: International Political Economy

A special topics course that applies the social sciences to issues relating to justice and the common good.